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  • $2,300,000 – Brain Injury
  • $650,000 – Motor Vehicle Accident
  • $800,000 – Construction Injury
  • $570,000 – Medical Malpractice
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  • $4,100,000 - Construction
  • $4,000,000 - Medical Malpractice
  • $3,000,000 - Vehicle Accident
  • $950,000 - Birth Injury Malpractice
  • $5,860,000 Medical Malpractice - Wrongful Death
  • $1,800,000 - Product Liability
  • $4,000,000 - Medical Malpractice
  • $3,000,000 - Vehicle Accident
  • $950,000 - Birth Injury Malpractice
  • $7,500,000 - Premises Liability

Chicago Personal Injury Blog

Illinois reaffirms the rights of bicyclists on roads throughout the state

Bicyclists generally have the right to use the road in Illinois - that is something that most people have long held as obvious under the law. However, last year a driver was accused of failing to yield to a bike rider and a judge threw out the citation finding conflicting rulings existed as to the rights of cyclists. That case involved the tragic death of a Viet Nam vet who took up cycling as a way to rehabilitate injuries he had suffered during his service to the country many years ago.

The Illinois General Assembly responded with overwhelming support of House Bill 5912, which has been signed and will take effect next year. The measure clarifies a subject that many believe has always been obvious. The law makes a clear statement that bicycle safety is important for everyone in Illinois.

Department of Transportation considers speed limiters for big rigs

With their large size and high speeds, trucks represent a major safety risk and are involved in thousands of fatalities on American highways each year. Last month, the U.S. Department of Transportation proposed a new regulation that would require all large commercial vehicles over 26,000 pounds be equipped with speed limiters. However, not all professional truckers think that's a good thing.

What are Speed Limiters?

Speed limiters, also called governors, are small devices that are attached to an engine's ECU -- or are sometimes part of the ECU's software itself -- that prevent a vehicle from going faster than a predetermined speed.

Cheating while obtaining a CDL leaves many at risk for injury

State and federal laws require truck drivers to obtain and maintain a valid commercial driver's license. The Illinois Secretary of State says that Congress passed the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety of 1986 due to a prior patchwork of laws that posed risks to anyone on the road when an unqualified driver got behind the wheel of a tractor trailer. To drive a massive truck in Illinois a driver must be qualified to handle the rig (subject to specified exemptions). To obtain a valid CDL, the driver must pass a battery of tests to show his or her knowledge and ability to safely handle the vehicle.

Unfortunately, major safety programs aimed at reducing the risks for serious injury and death can be sidestepped, at times, by unscrupulous people. The Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General recently released a report outlining several schemes that have been used by unqualified drivers to get a CDL.

Gruesome Mistakes Underscore Necessity of Medical Malpractice Litigation

OperatingRoom-300x200.jpgThe need for medical malpractice litigation is evident when medical care goes wrong and the hospital or physician at fault refuse to properly compensate the victim. The standard of care may vary depending on the location of the hospital and the experience of the staff. Cases involving negligent medical care or medical mistakes can be addressed by Chicago malpractice lawyers to protect the rights of the patient.

Government Tracking Hospitals to Crack Down on High Error Rates

HospitalHallway-300x173.jpgThe federal government is tracking data to crack down on hospitals that consistently commit high rates of avoidable or preventable errors in patient care. The government is relying on patient data collected by Medicare. The purpose of the program is to reduce "hospital-acquired conditions."

When Doctors Dream Up Ailments

doctor-1228627_1280-Pixabay-300x200.jpgDoctors who intentionally misdiagnose patients with conditions they do not have can pose a considerable risk to patient safety and quality of life. The treatments they prescribe are not only unnecessary, they may adversely affect patient health. When a physician deliberately misdiagnoses a patient with an ailment, they are committing fraud that is punishable by prison and fines.

Distracted Driving: Sometimes It's All in Your Head

It's nearly impossible not to drive without distractions in a multi-tasking oriented society. We're in a time-crunch these days, with work time bleeding into family time and the increasing feeling that if we're not constantly connected to what is happening now, we are left out. It isn't just what we are doing that can distract us from the task of driving, our mental state can have an impact as well.

We can become preoccupied with a stressful event at work while driving home or drift into thoughts about making dinner. Those cognitive activities negatively affect our focus on the road, yet still do not have the same impact as texting or other physical activities.

Molly's Law to Help Families In Illinois Wrongful Death Lawsuits

shutterstock_165636773-justice2-300x225.jpgMolly's Law, a new measure that was recently signed by Governor Bruce Rauner, will help Illinois families who are seeking justice in wrongful death cases. Inspired by Molly Young, an Illinois woman who was found dead in 2012 in her ex-boyfriend's Carbondale home, the legislation extends the statute of limitations in Illinois wrongful death claims and increases the financial penalties for non-compliance with the Freedom of Information Act.

Construction sites account for 20 percent of all workplace deaths

Construction sites are often a chaotic scene involving many different suppliers delivering materials, contractors working their trade and multiple companies occupying the site working hard to meet deadlines. It is no wonder that construction sites are dangerous. Heavy machinery, heights involved in constructing a building, debris and falling objects are commonplace. While most workers know of the potential dangers, you may be surprised to learn that federal statistics indicate that one in five of all fatal workplace accidents occur in the construction industry.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has identified what it calls the Fatal Four leading causes of fatal construction site accidents. The safety organization says that eliminating these four types of accidents would save more than 500 lives each year and reduce fatalities on construction sites by 57.6 percent (based upon statistics recorded in 2014).