• Search
  • Mail
  • Chat
Steinberg, Goodman & Kalish Personal Injury Attorneys | Chicago, IL
Free Initial Consultations
888.325.7299
banner
[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Watch Our Videos

Learn about our firm and how our expertise in personal injury cases will ensure that you receive the best possible outcome to your case.

Recent Cases

Recent Cases Results

  • $2,300,000 – Brain Injury
  • $650,000 – Motor Vehicle Accident
  • $800,000 – Construction Injury
  • $570,000 – Medical Malpractice
  • $4,300,000 – Medical Malpractice
  • $4,100,000 - Construction
  • $4,000,000 - Medical Malpractice
  • $3,000,000 - Vehicle Accident
  • $950,000 - Birth Injury Malpractice
  • $5,860,000 Medical Malpractice - Wrongful Death
  • $1,800,000 - Product Liability
  • $4,000,000 - Medical Malpractice
  • $3,000,000 - Vehicle Accident
  • $950,000 - Birth Injury Malpractice
  • $7,500,000 - Premises Liability

Anger may cause preventable doctor errors

Many people feel anxious when they seek out medical treatment. Whether it is the fear of a traumatic diagnosis or simply experiencing nerves over a routine examination, Chicago residents and people in other parts of the country may not rank potential doctor errors high on their lists of medically-related fears. That may change, however, in light of recent surveys completed by professional medical groups.

Disruptive doctors, or those doctors whose anger or other emotions affect the people they work with, may make up 3% to 5% of the body of practicing physicians. Surveys on disruptive behavior among medical professionals suggest that patient care is directly impacted by angry medical professionals, with one survey reporting that one-third of health care workers who reported disruptive behavior believed that the negative behavior contributed to patient deaths.

A psychologist who studies the problem of disruptive doctors notes that disruptive behavior is distracting, and although a nurse or other health care provider may not be the individual exhibiting hostility, their encounters with disruptive personnel may emotionally distract them from the care they are providing to patients. Distraction on the part of health care workers may lead to negligence in patient care, mistakes in treatment, and suffering for those in need of medical action.

Patients may choose to be proactive regarding their observations of disruptive doctor behavior and therefore may seek out new health care providers. While an expert suggests informing a former provider of the problems in behavior witnessed by the patient, peer counseling groups do exist to help health care providers manage their disruptive behaviors. The existence of these professional support groups may be of little comfort to patients who have suffered from medical mistakes due to the involvement of disruptive doctors in their medical care.

Source: USA Today, "When doctors are bullies, patient safety may suffer," Kim Painter, April 20, 2013

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information